Book Review

Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children By Ransom Riggs || Book Review

Hey Guys! It is Max here and I will be reviewing a widely cherished and a novel which was famously published called ‘Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children’ By Ransom Riggs today! I know, it has been some time (3 months, Max) since I last posted a book review and likewise, a blog post, however, I would clarify my disappearance and ‘existence’ in my next blog post named ‘Word My Life: Blog edition’ where you will be fully immersed into my life? I guess. So, stay tuned for that! 

‘Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children’ is a Young Adult, Fantasy novel which follows a 16-years-old teenage boy named Jacob as he deliberated through the somewhat ‘ambiguous’ demise of his grandfather and what his remaining last statements actually meant.

Without further ado, let us dive right into the book review!

Disclaimer:

  • All thoughts and opinions are on my own and…
  • The review for this book is ‘partly‘ spoiler-proof. So, feel free to stay until the very end of this article!

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“Their memory was something tangible and heavy, and I would carry it with me.” – Ransom Riggs, Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children.

Synopsis:

A mysterious island.

An abandoned orphanage.

A strange collection of very curious photographs.

A horrific family tragedy sets sixteen-year-old Jacob journeying to a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned bedrooms and hallways, it becomes clear that the children were more than just peculiar. They may have been dangerous. They may have been quarantined on a deserted island for good reason. And somehow-impossible though it seems they may still be alive. 

My thoughts: Introduction

I would like to commence with this discussion by elucidating on the cover of the canto. The cover resembles the genre of horror and it initially reeled me away from purchasing the novel, but as time had passed, voyeurism had gotten the best of me and I had decided to acquire the volume and read it. Now, for people who are leery of the horror genre, you need not fear to read this novel as it does not slither or show an abundance of tactile sensation in the novel except for the vintage photographs which I will be presenting in the later paragraph as it requires a section of its own. So, do not be deliberated and pick this novel up if you have undergone the obligation to study it.

To begin with this review officially, I would like to talk about the lack of plot that this book had contained. There was enough action to move the plot along in the last 25% and personally, I thought the last 25% was not as exciting as I had hoped it would be. I thought the middle chunk of the novel was interesting as we learnt about the world and the magic system. The first 25% lack serious plotlines which in turn, made the pacing run at a slower pace and lose its readers. Therefore, I personally thought that there should be more action and plot to move the story along instead of staying stagnant and repeat timelines that were already described and explained.

Moving on, we have the atmosphere and world-building of the novel. The ambience of the novel was empyreal and it had a stainless discretion of the dream-like state, fantastical element and dilemma. The writer had a way to juggle around with the atmosphere and not lose grip from it. Therefore, I had to give props to the author for creating such a wondrous atmosphere.

The world-building was really well formulated as well. The scenery and the parcel of the estate were falsified consistently and the dialect and the physiques around the sphere were also expedited and fleshed out which made the world building so phenomenal. The dwellings and the children were also well represented. Thus, I enjoyed both the world-building and the ambience of the novel.

Now, we will pontificate on the plot-holes before we sink into my favourite quotes paragraphs. There definitely were several instances where I went ‘huh?’ and ‘wait what?’ and I caught myself laughing because of the confusion but here are some questions I covet it will be answered in the next book:

  1. Do the items that they have acquired from the market goes back to the market as the day restarts?
  2. How did they create the timeloop?
  3. Why are there other loops in the B.C years and who had them created?

My favourite quotes from the book will be listed below as I had a feeling that they will either get stuck with me for a while or I just thought they were iconic and fancy to be read by my face:

“Wait here.
Hell I am. Why?
Because you’re six-five and have green hair and my grandfather doesn’t know you and owns lots of guns.” ― Ransom Riggs, Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children.

“The day that lay before (was) full of infinite possibilities, though in a million superficial ways it was identical to the day before.” – ― Ransom Riggs, Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children.

“Though I imagine we’re killing ourselves right now in all manner of ways that’ll seem insane to people in the future. And as doors to the next world go, a bog ain’t a bad choice. It’s not quite water and it’s not quite land – it’s an in-between place.” ― Ransom Riggs, Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children.

Writing: Middle Section Of The Review

The writing style for this novel was a little lack-lustre, uninspired and a little dull like a knife or a pencil that had not been sharpened in a long time. To clarify the dullness, the writing had a sense that I was plodding through the forest, eagerly trying to grind through the ground that was surrounded by altitudinous grass and daddy-long-legs. Perhaps I should give you all a glimpse of the writing style?

“Will you quit shouting and let me bleed in peace!” 

First of all, if a person is bleeding and is an adult in a child’s body, I do not think that they will speak like that unless they are extremely frustrated with the blood dispersing from their body. In this case, he was not frustrated: just trying to act tough which will always end in a bad way because right after this sentence, if my memory serves me right, he fainted. 

Secondly, the use of the exclamation marks… I know it was to emphasize that they are children and had not experienced whatever that was beyond the 3rd of September 1940 but it was pretty annoying to have exclamation marks to be thrown at your face at all corners of the book. It pretty much shows the writer’s insincerity in his writing. I just hope that in the next instalment of this series, the author reduces the use of exclamation marks.

The style that the writer had acquired and adapted to were the ones which I was not comfortable with due to the excessive use of exclamation marks which I had already explained above and the sluggish writing such as expressing objects or ideas that were already known in order to stretch out the sentences to hit the word limit and carefully enhance the number of pages which could have easily been condensed down to a quick 318 pages novel. *Sob* an overabundance of trees perished for the sake of lengthening the novel.  

However, there are two major highlights in the author’s writing that I would wish to discourse upon: the tone and the description that he had endorsed in his writing style.

The author set the tone which is interrelated to the atmosphere and settings of the novel perfectly. With a classic surplus of magic and silent ‘drop n’ go’ information about the world and its system, it kept its readers such as I, to venture deeper into the novel to snoop for the obscure quality of the writer’s intellectual invention.

The description of the novel which again intersects with the settings of the novel, allows readers to survey the panorama and the grace in its world and also, the aversion that was concealed behind of the blinds. The author described the architectures and the contemporary lives of people living in that specific domain wonderfully and further on defined the behaviours of the humans surrounding the range without a particular flaw. In addition, the writer delicately apprehended the daily talks and the accent they spoke in and knitted into the story flawlessly. Therefore, I enjoyed these 2 major aspects of the writing style.

Character: 4/5 Section Of The Review

Jacob was the protagonist that was depicted to be good but he had a lot of flaws such as being spoilt by his parents and had the need to live an extraordinary life- with or without his parents’ care and I thought this made him independent but being wealthily spoilt and rude to other fellow colleagues at his workplace was inexcusable and that, I thought, made him a genuine human that was crafted by an author. 

Although he had qualities such as the supposed ‘bravery’ and used mostly the right words to speak to his peculiars, that does not excuse him for being rude which leads to my next point. His character growth was exponential throughout the novel. He grew out from the ways he had spoken and he slowly but surely gained the momentum for being a brave teenage kid which I thought was remarkable.

However, his love interest named Emma was his grandfather’s admirer which actually sounds kind of wrong to me because you are practically stealing your grandfather’s suitor and I do not understand why Emma had to fall for Jacob instead of being just friends. Well, that leads to the next character that we will be bestowing the responsibility of this review on: Emma.

Emma is a stubborn-headed, narcissistic and rude adult who is stuck in a child’s body. She was obstinate because she does not listen to factual testimony that laid unadorned before her eyes, she was narcissistic because she only weighed on herself and how safe it was in order to protect the peculiar children instead of conversing on the fact that Jacob still have a life and a family which he had a responsibility to be right by their side to soother their family dynamics and not present them with anxiety instead of making them fret about Jacob’s well-being. Worst of all, she DOES NOT have a character growth and does not learn from her gosh darn mistakes. Oh well, finger-crossed for the next book.

This review is really shimmering my skin with ferocity. I think I should drink a cup of water before I continue…

*drinks cup*

Miss Peregrine is my favourite character in this book. She had an ambience of love for her peculiar children and gave them everything to make their lives much more interesting due to the fact that they lived on the same day over and over again. However, the children had a taste of depreciation and it saddened me to see Miss Peregrine being heartbroken over her achievements and ultimately, led to the disappointment of her own making. Miss Peregrine, I thought, was the motherly figure to these children as she protects them from danger like a mother chick and her babies. I hope they will get a taste of appreciation once again as Miss Peregrine is such an astonishing parent to the children.

Enoch is the worst character that I had ever laid my eyes on. He had ill intentions on making the children cry, a dark sense of humour and a torture device in human form. Just to give you an overall idea of the torture device thing I just said, he had the power to revive an inanimate object which means that he can also revive a dead person, if only he has enough supplies of animal organs. Victor, who is dead has a sister named Wyn and Enoch teases Wyn on her brother’s death by saying that he is going to revive him, but he did not do so which leads to Wyn‘s bawling. 

What in the… who in the world does that? I hope Hollow City has a character arc for Enoch. He can’t be this mean.

Overall: The Ending

I would award this book a 50% rating. Yes, right in the midst of my grading system. It had a plethora of blemishes which I did not personally appreciate. If you are reading or you have read it, I hope you have a pleasant experience with it. I, unfortunately, lack the experience of pleasantness when I was reading this novel. By the way, I will be reading the next book to see if the flaws have diminished, so stay tuned (again) to read my review for Hollow City!


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12 thoughts on “Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children By Ransom Riggs || Book Review

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